Canada 1986: New Realities
Publication
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 13 Feb 1986, p. 248-263
Comments (0)
Be the first to comment on this record.
Add your own comment.
Is it OK to make your name public?
Is it OK to make your comment public?
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.

thumbnail








Canada 1986: New Realities


An address focussing on broad economic and social trends, or on the "political economy." The need for Canadians to understand choices to be made, and the opinions underlying these choices, with regard to fiscal policy, social policy, and trade policy. Making correct choices dependant on the shared perception we have as Canadians of how our society and our economy are evolving. The speaker as futurist or futurologist sharing her views. A review of some concepts involved in speaking about the future, such as "post" and "post-industrialism." The address continues to look at various aspects of our society, and the world through a series of themes referred to as "Post-somethings." Each is followed by a detailed discussion of what the speaker means by that term, and how it affects us and our society. "Post-Industrialism" refers, in part, to changes in the ways of doing business and of linking businesses; introducing new services and new industries. The importance that taxation remain neutral, and balanced between economic sectors. A consideration of some of the characteristics of the service sector and of high technology. New linkages and developing worldwide linkages for marketing and financial skills. The crucial interconnection between these linkages in the technological age. Financial services as the best example of how our post-industrial society is evolving. The trend of the "post-assembly-line." The search for customised, personalised services and what that means for corporations. The trend of "ethnic demassification": segmented and varied markets. What drives research and development, with the U.S. as an example. In Canada, the need for a vision expansion to tackle the challenges and proceeds of networking, synergies, serendipities, and internationalisation of markets. Dealing with these challenges: a commitment to the Information Age and to another trend: the "Post-Gutenberg Trend." An exploration of the various "waves" of the information explosion and where we are now. Information-related industries as big business. Questions about education, especially in the "Post-Resource Age." An exploration of this issue, with figures and statistics in specific resource-related industries. The "Post-Government Trend" and government intervention in everyday life. The issues of cutting spending and that of increasing revenue. The connections between the welfare state, unemployment, and the quality of education. The question of consultation, consensus and collaboration between government, business and labour. The "Post-Risk-Taking Age." Entrepreneurship. The "post-union" society? Going beyond Canada, the "Post-Santa-Claus Period." Canada's trading relationship with the United States. The "Post-Ideology Period." The challenge of Adam Smith. The problem of weak leadership. Time to take stock.