Sharing the Responsibilities of Empire
Publication
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 13 Jan 1944, p. 225-237
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Sharing the Responsibilities of Empire


The complexities of the Empire. The urgent need for a careful consideration of Imperial problems, should the need for taking final decisions arise. The strengths and weaknesses of the Empire's Colonial system, as stated by Prime Minister Jan Christian Smuts of South Africa, along with his suggestions for changes by which the Dominions will assume larger responsibilities as sharers and partners in the Empire, thus creating fresh links between the Empire and the Commonwealth and create new interest and life in the system as a whole. An examination of the terms "Empire," "Commonwealth," and "Imperialism." Defining wherein a Commonwealth consists. The British Commonwealth, and what it stands for. The duty of Empire. The Commonwealth's position in the world, with a look at each country: Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India. The denial of the right of force alone to control the destinies of the world as the very essence of the claim made by ourselves and our allies. Giving convincing proof that we hold as an Empire, the place we have gained in trust for the good of the world. The path of highest duty ever a difficult one to travel. The conviction, as stated by Lord Rosebery, that "With all its mistakes and shortcomings the British Empire is the greatest secular agency for good that exists in the world." The United Nations. An opportunity for the British Empire to take a definite lead in cooperation between nations. The political organization of the Empire. Reconciling autonomy in the control of the interests peculiar to each self-governing unit of the Empire with the common responsibility for what concerns them all. Future problems. A final word about foreign affairs.