Democracy and the Legislative Process
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 11 Jan 1951, p. 167-178


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Democracy and the Legislative Process


Reference to development of the St. Lawrence Waterway, and the speaker's intention at the next session of Congress to see what can be done to bring about its completion, considered by the speaker to be a great link in national defence. An outline of the speaker's conception of the role of a United States Senator. Origins and history of Senators. Edmund Burke's conception of the role of a legislator, and the speaker's agreement with him. The legislative process as the principal means for achieving the aspirations of the people. The far-reaching effects of action taken by the legislature on the people's standard of living and their way of life. Questions debated in the field of social legislation in the Congress of the United States in recent years. Division in the Congress in the field of civil rights legislation and opposition to the further extension of Federal authority into the relationships between employer and employee, particularly in regard to the establishment of a policy that would outlaw job discrimination on the basis of race, colour or creed. The prevention of legislative action by this division. The role to be played by the Federal Government in social legislation. Commitment to a policy of non-discrimination in job opportunities in the U.S. The passage of Civil Rights legislation as one of the great tests of Democracy. An emphasis upon economic and military mobilization in an effort toward making our respective countries and their allied efforts as strong as possible. Communist propaganda making effective use in various parts of the globe of our deficiencies in the matter of civil rights. Quotation from ex-Senator Frank Graham of North Carolina on the democratic ideal and the role to be played by civic, business and educational institutions in attaining that ideal. The struggle for peace. Historic debate on foreign policy currently in the U.S. which will have tremendous and far-reaching consequences for the entire world. The nature of the world revolution now going on by those seeking social and political equality. Policies essential to the North Atlantic Pact. Paying attention to the empty stomachs of those we would wish to bring to an understanding of the ways of democracy. Mistakes made in this regard in China. The Point Four Programme and what it emphasizes. The need to show the world that we intend to practice our democratic principles.