Dinner in Honour of The Toronto Scottish Regiment
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 26 Jun 1974, p. 1-20


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The Dinner in Honour of the Toronto Scottish Regiment was "In the presence of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother" and given "by the Loyal Societies and Officers of the Toronto Garrison." With Brigadier General B.J. Legge acting as introducer, several people spoke with special regard to the Toronto Scottish Regiment, and Her Majesty, with presentations and toasts. Her Majesty also spoke. Other speakers included Colonel Hilborn (Her Majesty's Canadian Equerry, President of the Duke of Edinburgh's Awards in Canada, Part President of The Empire Club of Canada, Honorary Colonel of the Toronto Scottish Regiment); Lieutenant Colonel R.C. Rutherford (former Commander of the Governor General's Horse Guards, President of the Royal Canadian Military Institute, Vice-President of the Advocates' Society, and a leading barrister in Toronto); Lieutenant Colonel D.C. Johnston (Commanding Officer of the Toronto Scottish Regiment); P.B.C. Pepper (Past President of the Medico-Legal Society, a member of the Council of the Royal Commonwealth Society, President of the Advocates' Society); the Right Honourable Roland Michener (former Governor General, sixty-first President of The Empire Club of Canada); Colonel Lewis (Director of the Good Neighbours' Club, member of the Royal Canadian Military Institute and the Imperial Officers Club, Vice-President of The Empire Club of Canada). Ends with a note from the President of the Empire Club of Canada, Sir Arthur Chetwynd.
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26 Jun 1974
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English
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Dinner in Honour of The Toronto Scottish Regiment In the presence of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother by the Loyal Societies and Officers of the Toronto Garrison 26th June, 1974
CHAIRMAN Brigadier General B.J. Legge, C. ST. J., E.D., C.D., Q.C., PAST PRESIDENT OF THE EMPIRE CLUB OF CANADA

GENERAL LEGGE:

Your Majesty, Your Honour, Your Worship, Colonel Johnston, ladies and gentlemen: I have infinite pleasure in welcoming you to this festive dinner given by the officers of the Toronto Militia District and by the Loyal Societies in honour of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, the Colonel-in-Chief of the Toronto Scottish Regiment.

As Chairman, I have been asked to set the scene for this happy evening. Perhaps we might light-heartedly consider the fable of the American nun during the recent "energy crisis" in the United States.

The Reverend Sister was driving along a country road when she ran out of petrol. She walked to the nearest farm house and asked the farmer to give her enough gasoline to return to the convent. The farmer said, "I'll be glad to help you out, Sister," and they both looked around the dilapidated household for a container for gasoline. None could be found except an old bedpan which the farmer filled with gas. The Sister gingerly carried it to her car and was pouring it in her tank when another motorist, seeing the bizarre scene, jammed on his brakes and called to her, "Hey, Sister! I'm not of your religion but I sure admire your faith!"

Not everyone in this audience will be of the heady Toronto Scottish religion but we all admire the faith and accomplishments of Her Majesty's Toronto Scottish Regiment.

In the far-away depression year of 1939, Her Majesty made a magical tour of Canada and Toronto was alive with excitement for the first visit of the King and Queen to Canada. As a freshman, I remember standing in the guard of the University of Toronto Contingent of the Canadian Officers Training Corps and I have to concede, Your Majesty, that the guard was very inexperienced but gloriously loyal. It may interest Your Majesty to know that this was no mercenary loyalty because for three years of training each officer cadet received one cheque for $1.20 for the Royal Visit Parade. That works out to forty cents a year--and most of the cadets were so poor that instead of framing the unique cheque we had to cash it.

Then again, we recall with delight, Your Majesty's visit to your Regiment in 1965, with the splendid Mess Dinner in the Royal York Hotel. I mention that because of our indebtedness to your Canadian Equerry, Colonel Robert Hilborn, for being the talented chairman of that dinner and for working tirelessly to make it so memorable.

According to Aristotle, "If the citizens are of sound character I consider the town splendidly fortified." Because of the citizen soldiers in the Toronto Scottish Regiment, Toronto is a better place in which to live. Colonel Hilborn is still Her Majesty's Canadian Equerry, he is the President of the Duke of Edinburgh's Awards in Canada, is Past President of The Empire Club of Canada and is the Honorary Colonel of the Toronto Scottish Regiment. Ladies and gentlemen, I call on a superb Canadian, Colonel R. H. Hilborn, to propose the toast to the Colonel-in-Chief, the Toronto Scottish Regiment.

COLONEL HILBORN:

Mr. Chairman, Your Majesty: No Regiment is more blessed in its Colonel-in-Chief than is the Toronto Scottish. We are deeply conscious of the signal honour of being the first Regiment in the Commonwealth overseas to be paid a private visit by a member of the Royal Family and of having the high privilege of welcoming in person our beloved Colonel-in-Chief. We are proud indeed because in the person of Your Majesty we have with us not just a symbol but the living presence of a Royal and dedicated lady-a Queen Consort who supported a family, a people and indeed citizens everywhere in the free world during its darkest days-the mother of our Sovereign and one who makes new the words "gracious" and "radiant", who has come to visit her Regiment to strengthen and encourage us.

If I may be permitted a personal reference-my Scottish forebear, Sir William Irving, guarded Your Majesty's ancestor, King Robert the Bruce, as he lay sleeping in Dunskellie Cave while the spider spun. He served as Equerry to The Bruce, and now some seven hundred years later I am proud indeed to fulfill the same role with Your Majesty.

The warmth of our welcome is bound up in a very special way with the admiration we feel for the qualities of heart and character which you possess, for what you are in yourself. Together with the late King, Your Majesty bore in so high a spirit responsibilities unparalleled in the world. In your daily life Your Majesty exemplifies those things we value most--faith in God, concern for your fellow man, consecration to the public service and a delight in the joys of family life, so that our affection for your presence is greater even than our sense of the splendour of your state.

Since 1937 when Your Majesty honoured the Toronto Scottish Regiment by becoming our Colonel-in-Chief, you have been a part of our lives and a focus of our loyalty, respect and affection.

Before we rise, and with Your Majesty's permission, may I say that, in deference to the very welcome ladies and the generally uninitiated Sassenachs present, this toast will not be with the customary Highland honours.

Ladies and gentlemen, please rise, charge your glasses and drink with me to the health of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, Colonel-in-Chief of the Toronto Scottish Regiment.

GENERAL LEGGE:

Thank you, Colonel Hilborn. It has been aptly said by the Right Honourable Vincent Massey, our first Canadian Governor General, that Canada is the only monarchy in the Americas. To many Canadians, the monarchy is much more than a symbol and is a living example of everything good in the Canadian concept of service and way of life. The Royal House has always given leadership in charitable, educational, scientific, artistic, theatrical, musical and patriotic endeavours. On behalf of the Loyal Societies, Lieutenant Colonel R. C. Rutherford, Q.C., will make a presentation to Her Majesty, the Queen Mother. Colonel Rutherford is a former Commander of the Governor General's Horse Guards, is President of the Royal Canadian Military Institute, Vice-President of the Advocates' Society, and a leading barrister in Toronto. Ladies and gentlemen, Lieutenant Colonel R. C. Rutherford.

COLONEL RUTHERFORD:

Mr. Chairman, Your Majesty: the Loyal Societies were anxious to find gifts which would serve not only as a remembrance of this occasion, and the honour you do us at this time, but which might also provide some evocative expression of the fact of this happy and favoured land of Ontario.

It is for these reasons that we have chosen two watercolours by the Ontario artist, James Bessey, who is with us here tonight.

The first of Mr. Bessey's paintings is entitled, "Sugartime", which depicts the running of the sap in the maple sugar bush, a familiar sign of the joy of returning spring each year in our Ontario countryside. The second is "Hidden Valley", a representation of the splendour of the land wrapped in the silent mantle of winter.

We hope these paintings may sometimes bring you pleasure, Your Majesty, and we ask you to accept them from the Loyal Societies as a token of our abiding affection and respect.

GENERAL LEGGE:

Thank you, Colonel Rutherford.

To be the Commanding Officer of the Toronto Scottish Regiment is the quintessence of elitism. A well-known American garment manufacturer, Mr. Sam Levenson, was challenged about his patriotism by an American blue blood who boasted to Levenson, "My ancestors came over on the Mayflower," to which naturalised-citizen Levenson could only reply, "It's lucky for you that they did, because when I arrived here the immigration laws were much stricter."

The strict laws of admission to the ranks of the commanding officers of the Toronto Scottish Regiment were upheld when Lieutenant Colonel D. C. Johnston was appointed commanding officer. Like most militia officers, he is a successful civilian as an educational officer for the Ontario Government. Lieutenant Colonel D. C. Johnston will now present the regimental gift to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, as Colonel-in-Chief of the Toronto Scottish.

COLONEL JOHNSTON:

Your Majesty, it is my privilege now to ask you to accept a gift which comes from all former and serving members of the Toronto Scottish.

If anyone can be said to be the very heart of our regiment, it is our Colonel-in-Chief.

You have travelled a long way to visit with us and words cannot express our gratitude. I hope that we are worthy and remain worthy of this gracious gesture on your part.

Your Majesty, on behalf of all members of the Toronto Scottish I ask that you accept this small token of our respect and affection.

GENERAL LEGGE:

Thank you, Colonel Johnston.

May it please Your Majesty to now address your regiment, the guests of the Loyal Societies and the Toronto Garrison dining here in your honour.

HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH

THE QUEEN MOTHER:

I thank you, Colonel Hilborn, for your kindness in proposing my health.

I am deeply moved by the manner in which this toast has been honoured.

May I ask you, Colonel Johnston, to convey to all ranks of my regiment my heartfelt thanks for this beautiful goblet, etched with the regimental badge.

As I drink from it, I will always remember with happiness those days, in peace and in war, when I have visited the Toronto Scottish in its homeland and in mine.

Ever since I was last here, nine years ago, I have been looking forward to coming to Toronto once again, and to a reunion with my regiment. Each time that I have been in this city, your kindness and friendship have stirred my heart, and tonight, you have again shown me the same generous hospitality I have come to know so well.

I am so very grateful to the Loyal Societies, represented here this evening, for the honour you do my regiment, and for the opportunity you afford me of dining with them and with you.

I am indeed deeply touched by your gift of two very fine watercolour paintings by Mr. James Bessey. These Ontario winter landscapes show me a part of this province which I have not yet seen, and they will be a constant reminder of many pleasurable and interesting visits, and will be a stimulus to me to come again and go a little further afield.

I know that in this city, and province, you have strong and historical associations with the United Kingdom, and that you continue to enjoy and preserve those tics. The majority of your earliest pioneers came from Great Britain, but in recent years, most of the newcomers to Toronto are of neither British nor French origin. Here, people from all over the world are finding opportunities for full and rewarding lives. They are able to choose their various ways of being Canadian, respecting others, but not forsaking their own traditions. They owe much to their own efforts but they also are sharing an inheritance which you, in the Loyal Societies, help to preserve.

For you, who cherish the links between Great Britain and this country, help, by your example, all Canadians to see the crown as a symbol of national sovereignty, belonging to Canadian citizens of every national origin and ancestry. You are all a part of a new and developing Canada, which, at heart, is still the Canada with which I fell in love when I first came here thirty-five years ago.

My affection for your country has grown ever deeper and stronger with each succeeding visit. I have great pride in your loyalty to the Queen-your Queen of Canada-and in your devotion to the many ideals which mean so much to us all. There is both room and need for ideals in our world today. It is through such loyal and enduring associations as yours--fraternal, benevolent, and military--with your common attachment to the ideals of freedom and your allegiance to the Sovereign, that the unity of the British Commonwealth finds expression.

This dinner is a particularly happy occasion for me, as it brings me an opportunity of meeting, once again, the present and former officers of my regiment, with their wives. The presence here tonight of those of you who have served in two world wars, and in the years of peace, does me honour. The ideals that prompted and inspired your service, continue to be an inspiration to those who carry on, and who are prepared to devote so much of their time to the service of our regiment, and of our Queen.

The essential conditions of being a good regiment are to have achieved great things together, and to be determined on future achievement. May you who serve, and those who will follow you, continue to build upon our regiment's efficiency, loyalty, and devotion to duty, to the end that it will always be said: "This is the Toronto Scottish."

GENERAL LEGGE:

Your Majesty, it is impossible to say how moved we arc by your gracious words and how delighted we are to be dining with you. The Loyal Societies flourish in Toronto because they advance Canada's best traditions of service to the Crown, to Canada and to others. To propose the toast to the Loyal Societies we have invited an eminent Barrister, P. B. C. Pepper, Q.C.

Mr. Pepper was born in the beautiful cathedral city of Lichfield and was educated at a unique combination of institutes of higher learning, the Peddie School in Newark, New Jersey, and at Oxford. He served with the Royal Canadian Air Force during the second war, and is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School, is a past president of the MedicoLegal Society, a member of the Council of the Royal Commonwealth Society, and is the President of the Advocates' Society. I have great pleasure in asking Mr. Pepper to propose the toast to the Loyal Societies.

P. B. C. PEPPER, Q.C.:

Mr. Chairman, Your Majesty: as a junior Flying Officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force I never dreamed that I would see the day when I would be entertained at a regimental dinner in the presence of high-ranking officers; and of a regiment moreover that had as its Colonel-in-Chief, a Queen. But there is sitting facing me a senior Air Force officer. To me he is an obvious Air Commodore. I think he must be Captain of the Queen's Flight. I confess to an apprehension in addressing this large audience but you give me confidence, Air Commodore.

The motto of this lovely province of Ontario is "Ut Incepit Sic Permanet Fidelis", which I interpret as meaning "As it began so let it ever remain-Faithful".

I rise to toast the Loyal Societies and I salute them in having been in the vanguard of those who cherish the faithfulness of that motto. But faithful to what? It would be easy to say "the British tradition", but I prefer to deal in specifics and suggest that Britain has given Canada four great gifts--a form of government, that of constitutional monarchy, the Common Law, a respect for the rights of minorities, and a sense of fair play.

Much could be said of the constitutional monarchy. I speak only of one element-the benefits to be derived by the public of having cabinet ministers elected and not appointed, and thereby being exposed to the scrutiny of colleagues on the floor of parliament.

Without in any way feeling smug-but on the contrary entirely sympathetic to the plight of our friends south of the border--it is nevertheless right to observe that the political survival of a leader, discredited before many of the electorate, would be utterly impossible under a British system of government.

The Common Law is the distillate of the common sense of centuries. At the Commonwealth Law Conference in London in 1955, I attended a dinner at the Guildhall, at which the then Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Fisher, praising the Common Law, said that when he picked up The Times in the morning the first thing he read were the law reports, because there was much sense in the reasoning of the judges. The Common Law rests on the reasoning of intelligent and wise men. Reason--a priceless gift. It has been said it is a fragile thing, reason. But it is all we have between ourselves and anarchy.

The same thought has been expressed by Felix Frankfurter of the Supreme Court of the United States, an inheritor too of the Common Law of England. "I do take law very seriously, deeply seriously, because fragile as reason is-and limited as law is as the expression of the institutionalised medium of reason-that's all we have standing between us and the tyranny of mere will and the cruelty of unbridled, undisciplined feeling."

As to the respect for the rights of minorities, I confess to having a wee bit of English in my background. There would be many here who would claim the same. But I graduated from high school in the United States. I doubt that there are many present who can say that. In American history books there is a whole chapter entitled "The Louisiana Purchase of 1803", which describes how Napoleon, pressed for monies to wage European wars, sold all French North American possessions to the fledgling United States. It was a great swath of land, running from Champlain in New York through Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburgh) in Pennsylvania, to Louisiana and the Gulf. It was not only a large territory but it contained, at the time, a large population whose language was French. As we all know, there is little French spoken in the United States today. Napoleon was unable to sell the French possessions north of the St. Lawrence, because Wolfe got there in 1759. I have often thought how fortunate it was for Canada that the General who scaled the Heights of Abraham turned out to be British. And why?

With their traditional sense of respect for minorities, and what Churchill called in a later war "the spirit of magnanimity in victory", the British caused to be passed the Quebec Act of 1774. This generous and handsome statute preserved to the French settlers their religion, their language, their laws and their customs. Without Wolfe, and without that sense of respect for minorities, the French language would be today as extinct as it is in the United States, because Napoleon would have sold the French possessions north of the St. Lawrence with the other French possessions in North America to the United States in 1803. In my opinion Canada has greatly gained from the flourishing of her French culture, and the United States has lost by its extinction in the melting pot.

Fair play is what the English call "cricket", a sense of decency which is the hallmark of the civilised man. My late father-in-law, Dr. Palmer, was fond of pointing to a Union Jack and saying, "Whatever else, you can rely on it--wherever that flag was planted, men were treated fairly." Dr. Palmer was a Toronto surgeon. He was born in Petrolia, Ontario, graduated from the University of Toronto medical school shortly before. World War I, and then served as a Medical Officer in the trenches in that frightful struggle.

On one occasion, seeing two men caught on the barbed wire in no-man's land, he took a pair of wire cutters and accompanied a stretcher bearer party and, under a hail of machine gun fire, cut the men off the wire in which they were entangled and brought them back to the relative safety of a dug-out. The doctor left us some twenty years ago, but his wife, now in her mid-eighties, courageously survives. She has a photograph in a silver frame, browning a little at the edges since it was taken nearly sixty years ago, but unmistakably of herself and the doctor in the courtyard, equally unmistakably, of Buckingham Palace. The doctor had just received the Military Cross from the King.

I venture to relay this personal story because this photograph, being a memento of an occasion when my father-in-law met, Ma'am, your father-in-law, serves I hope to bring home to you in a personal way, the affection and esteem in which you and your family are held by so many of us here in Ontario.

But I revert to my toast. I have endeavoured to describe briefly the great gifts which the British people have given to Canada. These gifts have been treasured and cherished by many in Canada but, I think, here in Ontario, none more than by the Loyal Societies.

I ask the Company to rise.

My toast is to the Loyal Societies-Fidelis.

GENERAL LEGGE:

Thank you very much, Mr. Pepper, for your eloquent and persuasive words. You had a good case and the Loyal Societies are acquitted with honour.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier perfectly expressed the joy of Canadians in our diversity. "I love the France that gave us life. I love the England that gave us liberty. But the first place in my heart is for Canada, my home and native land."

Our only living former Governor General is the Right Honourable Roland Michener, and he is better able, than any other Canadian, to know the truth of those sentiments because he was indefatiguable in travelling this country as the Queen's representative. Mr. Michener is a Rhodes Scholar and still possess much athletic competence, particularly at the Grey Cup games. Mr. Michener's honours and recognitions in the fields of learning, politics, diplomacy and public life, both nationally and internationally, are legion. We are delighted that Mr. and Mrs. Michener are able to dine with us on this Royal occasion. As the sixtyfirst President of The Empire Club of Canada, Mr. Michener will respond to Mr. Pepper's eloquent toast. Your Majesty, ladies and gentlemen, the Right Honourable Roland Michener.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE ROLAND MICHENER:

Mr. Chairman, Your Majesty: To be spokesman for the Loyal Societies, in the presence of Her Majesty the Queen Mother, Her Honour the Lieutenant Governor, the Mayor of Toronto, the Commanding Officer of the Toronto Scottish Regiment, and so many distinguished guests and members of these same societies and regiment, is not only a privilege, for which I thank you all, but, like most privileges, it carries with it a rather formidable responsibility.

By actual count, there are fifteen societies, ranging alphabetically from the Advocates' Society and including in their vast membership the associations which Mr. Pepper mentioned, as well as other military and patriotic societies. Even their officers, if all assembled, could scarcely be accommodated in this sizeable hall, and their membership, if laid end to end (mind you, this is not likely to happen), would stretch, I believe, from the Humber River to Thunder Bay.

Individually they are persons of such variety of talent, interests, and opinions, that I am sure that it would not be possible to speak for all at once. Also, in their collective groups there is such diversity, that the alternative to an inadequate and nominated spokesman, would be to hear all of our Presidents, seriatim. Mind you, that would be agreeable, but rather like what I listened to once, in the Assembly of the United Nations, when each representative of twenty-two Latin American republics rose to second a motion of congratulations.

At least I bring to the task an affection for them all, and a knowledge of and respect for their work, gained in large part, as patron or honorary officer, as I gave to them the encouragement and support of the Crown in the last seven years.

Perhaps I should mention one exception--a society in which I could gain no foothold, for reasons I do not quite understand--the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire. However, my wife seems to have been able to fill that lacuna.

But I talk too much of differences. Tonight we are of one opinion in everything that matters. First, in thanking Mr. Pepper for the eloquent way in which he described our dominant interests and loyalties. We could not have desired a better advocate of our varied and collective social virtues, and he left no hint of criticism to be answered. We are grateful.

In another important matter all of us unite, and that is in affection and respect for Your Majesty. We have all joined, tonight, in tendering this dinner to the Toronto Scottish, a regiment which we rightly hold in highest esteem, and to do honour with them to Your Majesty, the Queen Mother, their Colonel-in-Chief.

The many loyalties which we represent: to the Crown, to our democratic and judicial traditions, our pride of ancestry and race, our regard for the Commonwealth, and our love for Canada, are all consistent, and symbolized by the person of our monarch.

Many of us remember, with emotion, how this unity was borne in upon us, when Your Majesty and our beloved King George VI brought all of Canada together by your visit in 1939. Again, this is a great occasion tonight, reminiscent of those happy days, and a time to renew both our affections and our loyalties.

GENERAL LEGGE:

Thank you very much, Mr. Michener.

A story is told of Saint Thomas Aquinas standing with Pope Innocent the Fourth in Rome while bags of treasures were being carried into the Lateran Palace. The Pope commented to St. Thomas, "The day is long past when the Church could say, silver and gold have I none." Saint Thomas replied, "Yes, Holy Father, and the day is also past when the Church could say to the lame man 'Rise up and walk'."

As with the Church, all noble regiments like the Toronto Scottish rejoice in their past and continuously strive to be ready to respond to any demand that Canada could ask of them during a future shock. To propose the toast to the regiment I have invited the Commander of the Toronto Militia District, Colonel R. W. Lewis.

In civil life Colonel Lewis is an accountant. He is concerned with all sorts and conditions of men and is a Director of the Good Neighbours' Club, a day-care centre for aged men. He is a member of the Royal Canadian Military Institute and the Imperial Officers Club and is a VicePresident of The Empire Club of Canada. Your Majesty, ladies and gentlemen, Colonel R. W. Lewis.

COLONEL LEWIS:

Mr. Chairman, Your Majesty: Canada and its militia are indivisible, for the militia in Canada was evidenced well over three centuries ago, and has been with us continuously since that time. It was before our country reached nationhood that our regimental system came into being with the passing of the Militia Act in 1855.

In the context of time, the regiment we are honouring tonight is young, but, as with life, the measure of achievement is not how long one has lived, but how one has lived to achieve. The achievements of the Toronto Scottish are many, and it all began fifty-nine years ago next Monday when the 75th Canadian Infantry Battalion was created. As Colonel Beckett and the members 'of his fledgling Battalion marched off to the Great War, little could they have guessed at the awful tally they would make on their return to Toronto four years later. Five and a half thousand men of the battalion went to that conflict, but only four and a half returned to the city. Over one thousand had been left dead on the field of battle, and half of those who did return had been wounded in the battles of that awful war. The battalion brought back a Victoria Cross, many other individual decorations and sixteen regimental battle honours, a remarkable record for a unit just four years old. Such was the patriotism of this new unit, and their determination that the threat of a similar holocaust should never catch them unprepared, that they sought to become part of the active militia.

Their dedication was rewarded and in 1921 the original battalion became known as the Toronto Scottish Regiment. The following year they formed an alliance with the renowned London Scottish, the first battalion of the British Territorial Army to take the field of battle in the First World War, and it is through this connection they adopted the distinctive uniform worn here tonight by the members of the regiment.

The most significant event in the life of the regiment, and the cause of this splendid dinner tonight, occurred in 1937 when Her Majesty graciously distinguished the regiment by accepting the appointment of Colonel-in-Chief. In 1939 the tragedy of history repeating itself did not find the regiment unprepared. The mobilization of the Scottish was impressive, for they were able to be the first formed Canadian regiment to reach the United Kingdom following the outbreak of war. The regiment was not long in Britain before it went to serve alongside the British expeditionary force in France. With the fall of France, the battalion returned to the United Kingdom and became a specialist machine gun battalion. As such, they were part of the raid on Dieppe. With the advent of the allied landings in Normandy, the regiment once again returned to France as part of the Second Canadian Division. The regiment subsequently fought in every action engaged by the Second Division in that theatre of war. Because of the regiment's specialist support role, they rarely fought as a formed regiment. Nonetheless, the accolades they received from their supported units were legion, and they distinguished themselves by winning many personal awards for gallantry. At war's end, they returned to their home city richer by twenty-one additional regimental battle honours.

Today, the regiment continues to serve as an active militia unit of the Canadian Armed Forces. It reflects those ingredients that have characterized its remarkable history: dedication, determination, competence, good fellowship, good citizenship, and a slight touch of arrogance. For these are the essential ingredients of a first class unit, and they are also the reasons why, if the need should arise, the regiment will make good its motto of "Carry on".

And so it is with pleasure that I have the privilege, on this royal occasion of a further milestone in the history of the regiment, to ask if it may please Your Majesty, and ladies and gentlemen, to join me in a toast to the Toronto Scottish Regiment.

GENERAL LEGGE:

Thank you, Colonel Lewis.

When Sir Winston Churchill was leading the free world as Prime Minister, during the Second World War, one of the boring, but ambitious, members of Parliament did everything he could to attract Sir Winston Churchill's attention. Dramatically unsuccessful, he caught Sir Winston leaving the House and said, "Mr. Churchill, I don't believe I have ever told you about my grandchildren." Sir Winston gallantly put his arm around the House bore and said, "My dear fellow, and I can't tell you how grateful I am for that omission."

Such is not the case with tales of the Toronto Scottish Regiment. Many of us Sassenachs cannot be perfect by becoming Scottish. Even in the Toronto Scottish Regiment, there are many like me who have not a drop of Scottish blood but who admire the accomplishments of the Scottish fact and inspiration in Canada. To respond to Colonel Lewis's toast is Lieutenant Colonel D. C. Johnston of the Toronto Scottish Regiment, which he has the high honour to command.

COLONEL JOHNSTON:

I am certain, Colonel Lewis, that all members of the Toronto Scottish sitting in this room this evening are most grateful to you for your generous and eloquent toast to our regiment.

The Scottish is well aware that many of those who toasted our regiment are members of other corps or regiments which are proud possessors of splendid histories. Your gesture was therefore most kind and generous. Thank you. The regiment would wish me to express its heartfelt thanks to the many Loyal Societies and other institutions which have sponsored this dinner. I cannot imagine a more glorious occasion and we are indeed grateful.

I would like, at this time, to bring to your attention the fact that Her Majesty has brought with her to Toronto some close friends of ours. As most of you know, the Toronto Scottish has been allied with the London Scottish for over fifty years. We are privileged to wear their cloth and to share many customs and usages with them. We are delighted then, to welcome to Toronto Colonel Penman, Joint Honorary Colonel, and Major Holliday who commands the London Scottish Company in the 51st Highland Volunteers.

At the end of the last visit of Her Majesty to our city some nine years ago, I overheard a conversation in our mess between a young subaltern and a retired officer of mature years. The young chap said, "What on earth can we do for an encore?" The older man looked him full in the face and replied, "Train, train again and then train some more."

This regiment is mindful of the fact that in order to justify the confidence of those set in authority over us, it must strive in the future to measure up to an exacting standard of readiness. The Toronto Scottish does not intend to rest on its laurels.

Again Colonel Lewis, ladies and gentlemen, may we thank you for your kind and enthusiastic toast to our regiment.

GENERAL LEGGE:

Thank you Colonel Johnston.

Ladies and gentlemen, this dinner in honour of the Toronto Scottish Regiment in the presence of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother is adjourned.

Thank you and goodnight.

NOTE FROM THE PRESIDENT

It is always an outstanding occasion when The Empire Club of Canada has the opportunity of taking part in welcoming members of the Royal Family. The dinner in honour of the Toronto Scottish Regiment with their Colonel-in-Chief, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, in attendance, on June 26, 1974, was such an occasion. Members of the Empire Club played an important part in the arrangements for this outstanding event.

Brigadier General B.J. Legge (now Major General), Past President of The Empire Club of Canada (1958/59), was Chairman of the Dinner Committee.

Colonel Robert Hilborn, Past President of The Empire Club of Canada (1964/65) , served once again as Canadian Equerry to Her Majesty.

The Right Honourable Roland Michener, Past President of The Empire Club of Canada (1964), was an honoured head table guest.

Also serving on the Dinner Committee were: Robert Armstrong, Past President of the Empire Club of Canada (1973/74); your 1974/75 President; John Fisher, First Vice-President of the Empire Club of Canada; Colonel R.W. Lewis (now Brigadier General), Third Vice-President of The Empire Club of Canada, Commander of the Toronto Militia District; three other Directors--Major Chas. C. Hoffman (Head Table Room), Dr. James A. Parish (Reception), Vladin Milic (Publicity), and Colonel R.C. Rutherford, President of The Royal Canadian Military Institute and a member of The Empire Club of Canada.

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Dinner in Honour of The Toronto Scottish Regiment


The Dinner in Honour of the Toronto Scottish Regiment was "In the presence of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother" and given "by the Loyal Societies and Officers of the Toronto Garrison." With Brigadier General B.J. Legge acting as introducer, several people spoke with special regard to the Toronto Scottish Regiment, and Her Majesty, with presentations and toasts. Her Majesty also spoke. Other speakers included Colonel Hilborn (Her Majesty's Canadian Equerry, President of the Duke of Edinburgh's Awards in Canada, Part President of The Empire Club of Canada, Honorary Colonel of the Toronto Scottish Regiment); Lieutenant Colonel R.C. Rutherford (former Commander of the Governor General's Horse Guards, President of the Royal Canadian Military Institute, Vice-President of the Advocates' Society, and a leading barrister in Toronto); Lieutenant Colonel D.C. Johnston (Commanding Officer of the Toronto Scottish Regiment); P.B.C. Pepper (Past President of the Medico-Legal Society, a member of the Council of the Royal Commonwealth Society, President of the Advocates' Society); the Right Honourable Roland Michener (former Governor General, sixty-first President of The Empire Club of Canada); Colonel Lewis (Director of the Good Neighbours' Club, member of the Royal Canadian Military Institute and the Imperial Officers Club, Vice-President of The Empire Club of Canada). Ends with a note from the President of the Empire Club of Canada, Sir Arthur Chetwynd.