Ontario's Course Is Clear
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 8 Jan 1946, p. 171-184


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Ontario's Course Is Clear


Ontario's plans for a more effective working combination of the powers of the Dominion and nine provincial governments. Attacks against the proposals of the Drew Plan. A response to some of those attacks. A quotation from the early part of the printed submission to indicate the basis on which the problems were approached. A better approach to settle differences of opinion in regard to the division of powers between the Dominion and provincial governments. Ways in which the Dominion and provincial governments are partners. Some words from the judgment of Lord Watson with regard to the character of Canadian federalism. Reasons why the Federal System appealed to those who drafted the Canadian constitution. Words from Lord Sankey in a judgment interpreting the British North America Act. A look at the rights of minorities. The minority rights and powers of the Government of Ontario in the very important fields of legislation. Purposes of union of the provinces, as set out as one of the conditions of the acceptance of Confederation. Keeping Ontario a strong and vigorous factor in the building of an ever stronger British Commonwealth and Empire. Ontario asserting her rights not to the disadvantage of any other province but rather in the belief that the strength of Ontario will contribute largely to the strength of other provinces. Urging the setting up of a Dominion-Provincial Co-ordinating Committee and the setting up of a Dominion-Provincial Economic Board. Details of such a Committee and Board. Also a proposal to set up a National Adjustment Fund, starting at $20,000,000, out of which would be paid annually the whole of that amount to those provinces in need of special assistance. Criticism of this fund clear evidence of a fundamental misunderstanding of where our taxes come from. Differences between the National Adjustment Fund and the Rowell-Sirois Report. What Ontario would pay to the National Adjustment Fund. A proposal in regard to corporation taxes: apportioned on the business done. A recommendation for the acceptance of the principle of deferment of postponeable construction under the inducement of Timing Grants. Welfare and health proposals. Insisting on the return to the provinces of their own taxing powers which they had before 1942, and which the Dominion Government solemnly undertook to return undiminished to the provinces at the end of the first fiscal year following the cessation of hostilities, with discussion. Objection to this proposal resulting in a duplication of taxes and heavier taxes. How the proposals would reduce taxes. The dangers of centralization. The need for a spirit of co-operation, understanding, and mutual good-will.