Canadian Immigration Policy
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 3 Feb 1949, p. 198-212


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Canadian Immigration Policy


Recent public discussion in Canada about the role of the civil servant. A summary of the speaker's views as to the duty of the civil servant. A discussion of Canadian Immigration Policy. A summary of Mr. Mackenzie King's clear and specific definition of the policy of his Government in relation to immigration on the 1st of May, 1947. The legal basis of the immigration policy. The Immigration Act. The definition of the classes or categories of persons who are admissible to Canada as immigration to be found in the Regulations made under the Act by Order-in-Council. A detailed discussion of Mr. King's definition of Canadian Immigration policy under three summary headings. The first has to do with the number of immigrants being related to the absorptive capacity of the country. The second reads "There is no intention of allowing mass immigration to make a fundamental change in the character of the Canadian population. In consequence, Asiatic immigrants must continue to be barred except in certain particular cases. At the same time the Canadian Government will be prepared to enter into special arrangements with any country 'for the control of the admission of immigrants on a basis of complete equality and reciprocity.'" The third summary is as follows: "During the depression and the war immigration was inevitably restricted; now the categories of admissible persons have been considerably widened. Special steps will be taken to provide for the admission of carefully selected immigrants from among the Displaced Persons of Europe." Steps taken by the Canadian government in line with this policy since the conclusion of hostilities. A summary of the results of the Canadian policy, with statistics. Noting the lack of organized opposition to the current expansion of the movement of immigrants to Canada. Prospects for the future.