The Invasion of Norway
Publication
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 14 Nov 1940, p. 179-192
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The Invasion of Norway


What took place in Norway this spring. Understanding what is going on in Europe today and understanding the situation in regard to Germany by taking out the Treaty of Versailles and reading it thoroughly. Germany starting from scratch when they began, secretly, to build up their military strength. The recognized importance of the Air Force to modern warfare. The German presumption that Norway would not defend itself. Germans as very bad psychologists. Evidence that Germany also believed that Norway would not fight. How unprepared Norway and Denmark were. A detailed description of the invasion of Norway. The escape of the King and the Government of Norway. Norwegian resistance. The German way of fighting. The infiltration of Norway by the Germans. How Norway is continuing to fight. The Norwegian merchant marine and Air Force outside of Norway. Escapees from Norway. 900 Norwegian sailors in England at the time of the Norwegian invasion who joined up with the British Navy. Hitler's secret weapon: mass invasion from the air. What happened in Norway giving England a chance to take the precautions necessary to stop German planes from landing. How the Germans lost the war in Norway and what it cost them. Hitler's nervousness now. The speaker's warning to the German soldiers in Norway, sent through the radio broadcast of this address. Some concluding words about the good that could come out of the occupation of France. Hopes that England will settle the peace terms. Suggestions for a police union of English-speaking people, the United States together with Great Britain, rather than anything similar to the League of Nations.