Let's Find the Answer
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 26 Mar 1953, p. 277-290


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Faulkner, Farley, and Associate, Speaker
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Text
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Speeches
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Mr. Faulkner begins by introducing his associate, Mr. Kerson, a law student who comes from Esthonia who will talk about his experience under Communism. Mr. Kerson:
Communism and the horrors of a Communist regime. The fact that people do not want to believe what is happening. Communism reaching the heart of Central Europe, right at the gates of the cradle of Western and Christian Civilization, with outposts in every country that is yet free. The danger of Communism to freedom, security and prosperity. How and why Communism is dangerous. A detailed description of Communist Esthonia and what it is like to live there. Fear created by killing and torture just one feature that characterize a Communist State. The passing of ten years since the Communists took over in Esthonia; changes for the worse over that time. Communism as a communicable disease which has spread to many countries in Europe. Mr. Kerson's hope that what happened in Esthonia will never happen in Canada.
Mr. Faulkner:
The difficulty of finding answers. A division of the address into two sections: the physical side which will deal with the Kremlin, and the moral side, which has specifically to do with us as individuals. The speaker's example of the physical side when he was grabbed by a "goon" squad and escorted out of Massey Hall when he stood up to defend England against accusations being made by the Dean of the Church of England, who was describing Russia as the "architect of the future." The Society for Soviet Peace and Friendship and what they do. Soviet agents in Toronto, and all over Canada, including in government. Doing a better job of selling our way of life. The role of faith and capturing a sense of mission. Encouraging the audience to participate in this challenge to freedom.
Date of Original:
26 Mar 1953
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English
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Full Text
"LET'S FIND THE ANSWER"
An Address by FARLEY FAULKNER and ASSOCIATE The Pro-Canadians Who Packed Massey Hall
Thursday, March 26th, 1953
CHAIRMAN: The President, Mr. John W. Griffin.

MR. GRIFFIN: Ladies and Gentlemen: Yesterday morning I sent the following cablegram to

"Her Majesty the Queen, Buckingham Palace, London, England.

On behalf of the 1800 members of The Empire Club of Canada I extend sincere sympathy on the death of Queen Mary STOP We will long treasure the memory of one who throughout her life represented all that is finest in the Empire and Commonwealth.

John Griffin, President."

I could say much more about Queen Mary as could any of you. There will be no mass memorial service held for her in the City of Toronto. It is not necessary because this service will be held in secret in the hearts of the Canadian people. There will be no monument erected to her because her monument is our memory of the life of her son, our late beloved King George VI, whose worth we did not know until he was no longer here. Her monument is our beautiful young Queen to whose grace and dignity and high imperial resolve Queen Mary made such a great contribution.

Mary Regina, may she rest in peace.

Article 6, sub-section 2 of the Club's constitution reads, inter alia, as follows: "A Nominating Committee consisting of five members of the Executive Committee and four other members shall be appointed by the Executive Committee and approved at a regular or special meeting of the Club and such Committee shall report to the Annual Meeting." Your executive has appointed the following gentlemen to serve on this Committee:

FROM EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

From Executive Committee S. S. Fletcher

Dr. C. C. Goldring J. Palmer Kent Harold Menzies Donald H. Jupp, O.B.E.

It has been moved by Mr. Colebrook and seconded by Dr. Crummey that these gentlemen be approved at your Nominating Committee.

All in favor of this motion, please indicate. Contrary, if any? It is carried.

Members and Guests of the Empire Club of Canada; Following the death of Stalin the Communists of Toronto and their fellow travelers held a memorial service in Massey Hall in honour of this infamous man. One plain citizen of Toronto, Farley Faulkner, was so incensed at these proceedings that he organized a counter-meeting in the same Hall a few days later. On this occasion Mr. Faulkner and a number of men who had escaped from the horrors of the Communist-dominated lands set forth a true picture of the late Russian leader and portrayed him, not as the white hope of mankind, but as the ravening beast he was.

Of United Empire Loyalist stock, our speaker is the son of a physician who was a Minister of the Crown in

From the Membership R. A. Stapells

Z. S. Phimister H. R. Lawson Col. W. H. Montague the Hepburn Government and the grandson of a man who was reeve of a Hasting's County Township for many years. Mr. Faulkner's early training was as a newspaperman and writer and it was through this connection that he first became aware of Communist propaganda methods.

In the world of today most men are willing to leave difficult tasks to someone else. We are all aware of the prevailing tendency to leave everything to that vague and unspecified body which we call "the government." And yet, deep in our hearts, we all know that we have a duty to participate actively in the affairs of our great Dominion our Province and our City. It is only when the citizens of a Political Unit are alert, informed and even, if need be, violently interested in public affairs that that Political Unit is well-governed. Mr. Farley Faulkner is a wonderful example of the ordinary citizen who "decided to do something about it". The people of Toronto will always be grateful to him for having demonstrated conclusively that there is real vitality in the forces of justice and right. As long as there are alert and vigorous citizens like Mr. Faulkner to spring to the defence of our institutions we need not fear the enveloping gloom that blankets the lands beyond the Iron Curtain. Mr. Faulkner!

MR. FARLEY FAULKNER: Mr. Chairman, Honoured Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen: I wish I could believe just about one-quarter of what your president was so kind to say about me personally, but about the general text of his remarks I can believe it 100%, and I would like to introduce one of the very first chaps who came to my rescue, to help me with the job I was to do. This chap is a law student here. He comes from Esthonia. His name is A. Kerson. He will be a real good Canadian citizen, and there are thousands like him coming over here. He has the same thoughts and the same feelings that we have regarding this precious heritage of ours, that we refer to as our "freedom", and he will tell you now for a few moments a little bit about Communism as he experienced it in action.

Mr. Kerson!

MR. KERSON: Mr. Chairman, Honoured Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen: It is a great privilege to be here today with Farley Faulkner, and talk about Communism. It is also a very pleasant task to do that. I should say, only the task is pleasant, because the subject is very unpleasant.

Communism, and the horrors of a Communist regime, all the deportations and killings, and purgings and distress, are so much talked about today and written about, that not a few Canadians would become bored, and they would perhaps ask, "Can all this be true?" I understand this attitude, because Canada is such a free and happy and prosperous country, and people very understandably dislike to think about unpleasant things. They would rather not believe and go about their business. But this very attitude prevailed in Esthonia in 1940 when Communism made its first steps toward world conquest. The three Baltic countries were the first victims of Communist aggression. These were small countries, but since it has been proven that larger countries can be subdued in the same manner.

Now Communism has reached the heart of Central Europe, and is right at the gates of the cradle of Western and Christian Civilization, and has its outposts in every country that is yet free. Communism is therefore a danger, a real danger to freedom, security and prosperity.

Now you might ask me, "Why then is Communism dangerous?" In reply, I would like to give you a few glimpses of life under a Communist regime, in a country that the Communists had taken over. This country is Esthonia, where I came from, and where I had the misfortune of spending one long and terrible year under Communist rule, of which my impressions are indelible.

If you would have had the misfortune to be in Communist Esthonia at that time, the first thing that you would probably notice is that the country is under foreign occupation. Of course, as a rule, there is no Communist country without the Red Army occupation. This Soviet occupation can by no means be compared with the occupation upon which the British rule of India where the whole 300,000,000 was ruled by a couple of thousand military was based in more civilized times. In Esthonia, where the population is a little over 1 million, there were approximately 200,000 Red Army soldiers, plus tanks and ships and planes-it is a tremendous show of force that was exhibited in Esthonia in June, 1940. Naturally, the country is completely paralysed, the people numb with terror. Now the time has arrived for the local Communists to take over. I should say in Esthonia at that time there were proportionately the same number of local Communists as there are now in Canada. These local Communists form a government, and, together with the Soviet Communist party, the powerful Soviet secret police, and under the protection of the Red Army bayonets, they transformed the free, democratic and Christian and relatively prosperous Esthonia into the pagan Communist state it has remained until these times.

This Communist Esthonia, ladies and gentlemen, is a peculiar creature; it is quite different from anything the average Western man could possibly visualize. Of course, there is, no private property. There is but one employer, and this is the state, and everybody is dependent for wages and salaries upon this sole and powerful employer. Naturally, you can not express your opinion freely, or elect your representatives to govern you. You have to spend most of your Sundays attending compulsory meetings and parades. The treasured weapon of the workers, the strike, is a memory from the cursed capitalist past. The trade Unions are now but agents of the sole employer, the state. If you wanted to be a loyal subject and get ahead in the Communist hierarchy, you couldn't afford to be seen in church, or to send your children to Sunday School.

The Communists proclaim a fair distribution of wealth, but they achieve an unfair distribution of poverty, because everybody in Esthonia is much poorer now than he ever was in capitalist Esthonia, with the exception, perhaps, of the Communist bosses. These are a few features, Ladies and Gentlemen, of a Communist regime, but they are all commonplace, of a secondary order. People are poor, they have no freedom, nor have they leisure. All this is bearable.

But, if you would have been there, you would have noticed as a salient feature something that really characterizes a Communist State, a feature I should say of a mental or spiritual order. And this is fear. People are frightened. Nobody is safe any more, because everybody who is not a whole-hearted communist, is suspect of anti-communism, and therefore liable to extermination as an enemy of the state. This fear is created by systematic arrests, deportations and executions. People simply disappear--from the streets, from their homes, usually in the early morning hours. And they very seldom return. The victims wind up in the execution chambers of a local jail, or in the vast slave labor areas in Siberia where death is a little more slow. A fine example of this method of governing, of obtaining obedience by the medium of fear, took place on June 14th, 1941, when in the course of 24 hours, 9730 Esthonians were arrested; Esthonians from all walks of life, men, women and children, most of them dragged from their beds between three and five in the morning. These people were first loaded into trucks, and then, at the railway stations, reloaded into cattle cars, from 30 to 50 humans per car, men separated from their wives and children, and then transported several thousand miles away from their homes to the Siberian peat bogs and mines. Hundreds of these unfortunates died and lost their minds, or committed suicide, on this terrible journey. This is but one example. The result of one single year of Communist rule in Esthonia was that a little over 60,000 Esthonians were either killed directly or indirectly by way of starvation and mistreatment in slave labor camps. And this was peace time in Esthonia. When you read news reports from Europe, and find that every week thousands of people are fleeing, at the risk of their lives, from East Germany, Poland, and Communist countries, then you can again see this fear, because people don't risk their lives if they are not very much afraid. Thus fear is created. At first you feel it, and it disturbs you, but from year to year you become insensitive, and you will slowly transform into a different creature from what we know a man to be-you are transformed into the Soviet man.

There are many features that characterize a Communist State, but this fear created by killing and torture is perhaps the most salient. At the conclusion I would like to say there is also one pleasant fact about this Communist rule,--to see how the local Communists fared, the traitors who took over power in Esthonia in 1940 and so assiduously helped to destroy the country. As an illustration, I would submit a single fact.

Of all those Communists who took power then and who very prominently appeared in the State reports, not a single one appears today any more in radio, or in newspapers, or in letters, or in official reports. This fact I always like very much to recommend as a subject for meditation to our Canadian Communists.

This is Communism in action, very briefly stated, from experience in 1940. The question might arise: hasn't it changed in the meanwhile? More than ten years have 'passed. We are still receiving newspapers, letters and reports from Esthonia. If it has changed, then for the 'worse. There are the same things-poverty, killings, 'deportations.

A similar fate has befallen not only Esthonia, but many countries in Europe. You will see that Communism is really a disease; and there is the danger that it will spread. It is a communicable disease. I would not like these things to happen to any country in the world that has had the good fortune to remain free, and certainly I would not want these things to happen to this prosperous and beautiful and free and democratic Canada.

MR. FARLEY FAULKNER: Mr. President, Honoured Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen:

When your President called me on the telephone, in the midst of what I now refer to as "my twelve day nightmare" during which I lost weight under the pressures and demands the public can make of you; when he "phoned me and asked me would I address this Club,

I said I would, and I would be honored in the privilege. Then he said, "What would you speak about", and I very glibly said, "Let's find the answers."

Ladies and Gentlemen, the answers are not easy to find. There are some very brilliant brains and some men who are just as sincerely interested in finding the answers as I am, in Washington, London and Ottawa, and all of the answers have not yet been found.

I have chosen to divide into two sections my answers. I have had very little time to think about answers, but to this moment, in the two or three hours I have had, I see this thing first from the physical side--the physical side which will deal with the Kremlin. And secondly, and probably more important, I see it from the moral side, which has specifically to do with us as individuals.

Now the hand of the Kremlin succeeded in reaching into Massey Hall and grabbing hold of my body when I stood up to defend England against accusations being made by the Dean of the Church of England, who was describing Russia as the "architect of the future", and referring to England in a very bad light. My reward for that was that I was seized by what they call a "goon" squad and escorted out of Massey Hall. Now that is the physical hand of the Kremlin, and it can reach into the heart of this loyal city and into Massey Hall in such a manner.

As I was being escorted out the voice of the Kremlin spoke in almost a sneering way, and said, "If you want to speak, then hire a hall." That is probably the only command that I will ever obey that will come from that voice. That voice thought that I would forget it, that I would reject it, and that I would go back to my little business and look forward to the opening baseball game.

But I started to think about that voice and that challenge, and when my son came up here to play in a School Provincial play-offs, I put the question to him. I said, "Bert, this is what has happened. This is what I think I should do about it. If I do this, I shall probably dedicate the rest of my life to trying to make a contribution to the welfare of this nation. You as my son will be exposed to criticism of your father by all the enemies that my good conscience will choose to oppose, because I will do what I think is right and follow the dictates of my conscience and seek the guidance of God in such matters." My son is nineteen years old, and about 6' 21/2". He straightened up and said, "Dad what are you waiting for?"

So on a Sunday I went down to the Globe and Mail, had a chat with the editor, discussed the thing. He referred me to Bruce West, a columnist who did what I call the "kick-off for this play."

I would not like to leave the Massey Hall picture without mentioning that Kremlin Agency,--the Society for Soviet Peace and Friendship. Friendship! All they did while I was there was rip to pieces a man whom I admire more than possibly any other man at this moment, Dwight Eisenhower. Then these "friends" turned their fire on Churchill who did such a splendid job when the chips were down in the Second World War, when England was standing alone--this England that the Dean of Canterbury chooses to show in such a bad light. If that is their idea of peace and friendship, I don't want any part of it.

Still on the physical side of this thing,--I just want you to realize that these people are not ghosts or witches, they are real people. They are here in Toronto, and they are all over Canada.

They are in government. I don't say they are in high places in government: they don't have to be in high places. Alger Hiss was not in a very high place. Are there many? No, they do not require many. Right now in the Soviet itself there are less than 1 % of the total population who are privileged party members. Now who are these people? Are they civilized? Should they be treated as civilized people? Their hands are bloody with the murder of millions of men and women just like you. And I am going in with the help of Mr. Kerson and others like him to organize a Coast to Coast information and Lecture Panel service, which will take to the people of this country the picture of what is really behind this Kremlin mask. This should counteract some of the propaganda that they are putting across to our school children and you people.

When I was a boy there was a sign I used to pass on the way to school. It said, "Palmolive Soap keeps that school girl complexion." And do you know that after I passed that sign for many months when I would see a girl who had a lovely complexion, I would say to myself, "Ah, she uses Palmolive Soap." That is what selling can do. They keep repeating such charges as germ warfare that many of our people begin to believe them.

We have a better product, and we should do a better selling job than these people, and we will, we must, take the initiative in this regard.

Shakespeare wrote:

"Hear me, good brother,

Under your pardon. You must note beside. That we have tried the utmost of our friends, Our legions are brimful, our cause is ripe: The enemy increaseth every day;

We, at the height, are ready to decline. There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune, Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries.

On such a full sea are we now afloat,

And we must take the current when it serves, Or lose our ventures."

We must take the initiative from the Kremlin. That's why "I like Ike." I think he is the kind of man who will help us do it. Here is a letter from a school teacher.

"Dear Mr. Faulkner:

Would you please mail me two tickets for your meeting at Massey Hall for March 12th?

I for one am very pleased at what you are contemplating because I have felt for some time Mr. Average Canadian was taking our way of life too-for-granted: I felt that way particularly last spring when I went to Maple Leaf Gardens to hear for myself just exactly what were the charges Dr. Endicott was making. I had known Mrs. Endicott as she was a member of the Board for which I teach.

That evening disturbed me greatly, and at one point when I could no longer take the charges levelled against our leaders, I called out "That's not true"! But when three men seated behind me retaliated "Yes, it is"! I decided I had better keep quiet. I was alone and had on my new spring hat!

So in the face of that, Mr. Faulkner, I would not risk going to hear the Red Dean-and after what I observed and heard at the Spring Rally, I am not surprised at the treatment you received.

I think you will be surprised to find how many of us are behind what you are doing and are keen to hear some of the good ways of our Democratic way of life expounded upon."

I now am going to get personal. Bernard Baruch has referred to our weakening moral fibre. The Professors will tell you about our moral vacuum. Last night Mr. Lester Pearson explained Religion has a part to play in this, but I believe that the miracles that democracies have performed in the past, and will perform in the future, are miracles that come from the individual hearts and minds and sweat of individuals. It is a collective effort. But it starts with the individual. It can't be laid on by a bureaucracy, or a government. It has to come up from you.

One of the obvious first steps to defeat a Godless Communism is go to Church. We should find ourselves before we go looking for Communists.

I had women call me in the last few days whose children have been approached with propaganda from the Kremlin. One, a Lieutenant-Commander's wife, told me her fourteen-year old son came and asked her, "Why is Mr. Eisenhower trying to pick a quarrel with Russia?"

An amendment to the Criminal Code, would simply be a final resort, a last resort, and a very poor resort. We would be admitting, that we are too lazy to cope with this problem ourselves, and we would like the government and the police force to look after another job for us. This is YOUR JOB. Freedom is everybody's business.

When I was a newspaper reporter down in Belleville, there was a typical drowning accident. Many people were gathered around the body of a small boy. I was on the fringe of that crowd and behind me was a lady who was just morbidly curious. We worked our way towards the centre. Then something happened that I will never forget as long as I live. The lady beside me screamed: "My God. My son!"

Ladies and Gentlemen, freedom is the precious child of every good citizen here. We must take more than a morbid crowd's interest in that child if we are going to preserve it or be worthy of it.

Now as far as faith goes, John Foster Dulles says we must capture a sense of mission. This must start at your level too. I think we have to re-capture the faith, the dream and the imagination that the early pioneer had when he landed on this continent, looked around, saw a lot of trees, nothing much else, and said, "This is God's country!" Let's try to keep it that way!

We are still young. Our pioneering has not even started yet. And we have faith! This story will illustrate what I mean. I was driving in the country one Sunday night, and the sky was illuminated for miles around by a fire. When I arrived I saw the barn had been burned to the ground, and most of the livestock had been lost. Livestock, as you know, get panicky during a fire and do not like to leave their stalls. The house had been burned to the ground too. There were two people standing there, a man and a woman. Their hands were interlocked, and although there were hundreds of people there, I knew that this man and woman were the husband and wife, and that twenty years or so of their lives had been spent in building up what had burned to the ground, and I studied their faces, and the man said something--he said, "We will start again, we will start again!" And his hand tightened on that of his wife. I made some enquiries and learned they did not have 5 cents fire insurance. BUT THEY HAD FAITH.

So we still have it, and let's get it alive and working, and active, in our every-day life before our Freedoms are taken from us. While faith remains we will have freedom.

Freedom has always been challenged by tyrants. It has never been an easy road. And there is no easy answer to this present challenge.

I have had letters from mothers and fathers who have sons in Korea and Germany, and frankly, these people are confused. They all say, "It is time to do something about this." They don't understand, their sons don't, and all the speeches in the world will never explain to them, why they are being shot at by Communist bullets in Korea, and we are receiving these people here with open arms and allowing them to contaminate our schools and the whole fabric of our national life. We must replace confusion with faith and vote these people out of office. We must pay more than lip service to the church and be better citizens.

I am glad to have been here, today. I have been so busy trying to set up an Ontario Executive--about fourteen hours of my days and nights are occupied in this work--that I have not had time to prepare anything that would even sound like a speech. But I will have time to think later on. My Executive will be organized. I have some of the best selling brains that I can get for this important work.

But organizing is not an easy job, as many of you men who have had to do it know, and it is doubly difficult in this type of work because instead of checking a man one way I have to check him three different ways, and even then I may be wrong.

Now I would like you people to go out from here with this thought in mind, that you as citizens of Toronto will do your utmost to be better citizens of Toronto. If you are not going to church, I would suggest you try it. If you have children going to school, I would suggest you make it a point to meet the teachers of your children, and join a Parent-Teachers Association. You show that you are actively interested in good work because you belong to this Empire Club.

In closing, I would like to pay my tribute to the late Queen Mary. I think her whole life was one of the finest examples in the history of the Commonwealth of devotion to duty, an example for us to follow.

Thank you very much.

THANKS OF THE MEETING were expressed by Mrs. Kate Aitken.

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Let's Find the Answer


Mr. Faulkner begins by introducing his associate, Mr. Kerson, a law student who comes from Esthonia who will talk about his experience under Communism. Mr. Kerson:
Communism and the horrors of a Communist regime. The fact that people do not want to believe what is happening. Communism reaching the heart of Central Europe, right at the gates of the cradle of Western and Christian Civilization, with outposts in every country that is yet free. The danger of Communism to freedom, security and prosperity. How and why Communism is dangerous. A detailed description of Communist Esthonia and what it is like to live there. Fear created by killing and torture just one feature that characterize a Communist State. The passing of ten years since the Communists took over in Esthonia; changes for the worse over that time. Communism as a communicable disease which has spread to many countries in Europe. Mr. Kerson's hope that what happened in Esthonia will never happen in Canada.
Mr. Faulkner:
The difficulty of finding answers. A division of the address into two sections: the physical side which will deal with the Kremlin, and the moral side, which has specifically to do with us as individuals. The speaker's example of the physical side when he was grabbed by a "goon" squad and escorted out of Massey Hall when he stood up to defend England against accusations being made by the Dean of the Church of England, who was describing Russia as the "architect of the future." The Society for Soviet Peace and Friendship and what they do. Soviet agents in Toronto, and all over Canada, including in government. Doing a better job of selling our way of life. The role of faith and capturing a sense of mission. Encouraging the audience to participate in this challenge to freedom.