Relations of the United States with Canada and Great Britain
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 12 Jan 1905, p. 136-137


Description
Creator:
Ellis, P.W., Speaker
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Speeches
Description:
Thanks to Mr. Foss. Assuring Mr. Foss that the manufacturers of Canada regard with the greatest interest the progress, the energy, the forwardness of manufacturing in the United States. Many manufacturers now moving across the Line, becoming Canadian manufacturers and operating under the British flag. Welcoming Americans to participate in the great advantages and great prosperity we look forward to in Canada. The significance of the presence of Sir Edward Morris, the Minister of Justice from Newfoundland, and the Hon. Mr. Marine, the Leader of the Opposition. Newfoundlanders as Canadians. The speaker's belief that in due time Newfoundland will be part of Canada.
Date of Original:
12 Jan 1905
Subject(s):
Language of Item:
English
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The speeches are free of charge but please note that the Empire Club of Canada retains copyright. Neither the speeches themselves nor any part of their content may be used for any purpose other than personal interest or research without the explicit permission of the Empire Club of Canada.
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Full Text
RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES WITH CANADA AND GREAT BRITAIN.
ADDRESS BY MR. P. W. ELLIS.

Mr. Chairman,-

It gives me great pleasure to join with the Honourable Mr. Morine in the very eloquent vote of thanks he has moved to Mr. Foss, whom I think I can assure that we Britishers, born out of Great Britain, welcome most heartily this evening. We have listened with the greatest interest to the Reciprocity question as viewed in the United States by one of her leading manufacturers; and I can assure Mr. Foss that the manufacturers of Canada regard with the greatest interest the progress, the energy, the forwardness of manufacturing in that country; we watch closely every move they make; it is a great stimulus to us and I believe we are further advanced because we are near to them. They experiment and we join in trying to reap some part of the advantage. They create a market and are catering to people with like tastes to ourselves and we, Mr. Chairman, help to fill that market; and in other respects we have very much to thank them for. Again, as you know, many of their manufacturers are now moving across the Line, are becoming Canadian manufacturers and operating under the British flag.

We can only say that when they look to this country with the jealous eye of participating in the great advantages and great prosperity we look forward to, and is so quickly arriving to enjoy, we welcome them; we offer a fair field and no favour, but they must enter it by the employment of the people under our own flag and within our own boundaries. Now, Mr. Chairman, I think we are especially honoured in having Sir Edward Morris, the Minister of justice from Newfoundland, and the Hon. Mr. Morine, the Leader of the Opposition, with us, and it is especially significant that they should be present this evening together. There may be something behind the scenes; if we hold our ear to the ground there may be some reason for their appearing in Toronto, the Imperial City of the Dominion, at this particular time. They surely realize and believe that we want Newfoundland. We believe they are Canadians the same as ourselves. We believe in due time they will be with us. There is really no difference between us. We do not wish to hurry that any faster than their own desires may help to bring it about. We know that there must be a preliminary education.

The Newfoundland people have been accustomed to look to Great Britain; their trade has been with Great Britain; they do not know very much of us up here; and I think it is very fortunate that their leading men should come away up into the centre of our country and observe what we are doing and listen to the addresses we have listened to this evening; and I feel sure they will go back to Newfoundland and they will tell their people of what they have heard and seen here. That must be helpful and will be greatly advantageous in bringing about those cordial relations, and the more intimate relations and the joining together, that we hope some day will take place. I have very much pleasure in supporting the vote of thanks.

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Relations of the United States with Canada and Great Britain


Thanks to Mr. Foss. Assuring Mr. Foss that the manufacturers of Canada regard with the greatest interest the progress, the energy, the forwardness of manufacturing in the United States. Many manufacturers now moving across the Line, becoming Canadian manufacturers and operating under the British flag. Welcoming Americans to participate in the great advantages and great prosperity we look forward to in Canada. The significance of the presence of Sir Edward Morris, the Minister of Justice from Newfoundland, and the Hon. Mr. Marine, the Leader of the Opposition. Newfoundlanders as Canadians. The speaker's belief that in due time Newfoundland will be part of Canada.