Relations of the United States with Canada and Great Britain
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 12 Jan 1905, p. 137-138


Description
Creator:
Mason, Lieut.-Colonel James, Speaker
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Speeches
Description:
Comments on the evening's addresses. The nature of the addresses as a debate. Looking upon tonight as the red-letter event in the history of the Empire Club. The vote of thanks to the Honourable Mr. Foss.
Date of Original:
12 Jan 1905
Subject(s):
Language of Item:
English
Copyright Statement:
The speeches are free of charge but please note that the Empire Club of Canada retains copyright. Neither the speeches themselves nor any part of their content may be used for any purpose other than personal interest or research without the explicit permission of the Empire Club of Canada.
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Full Text
RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES WITH CANADA AND GREAT BRITAIN.

THE PRESIDENT, LIEUT.-COLONEL JAMES MASON.

Gentlemen,-

The address of the evening and the discussion that has followed have taken somewhat the character of a debate and if you were to desire me to give a decision on its merits I think I would take refuge in the answer made by a countryman of my own under the following circumstances. He and a friend of his were both in a British regiment, both Irishmen of course, full privates; one of them was an exceptionally well-behaved man, and rather better behaved than the other; and as is always the case in a British regiment they were on the lookout to promote worthy men, and this individual in the course of time was promoted to be a Sergeant. These two men had been chums all along, but when one of them got the stripes and the chevrones that indicated his rank he had, according to the regulations, to cease being a chum with his old friend; and the old friend naturally resented this uppishness, as he might have termed it, of his late comrade. He put up with it for some time, but one day almost boiled over and went up to his old friend and said: " Mike-Sergeant I mean-supposing a private went up to a sergeant and said to him, `You have got the manners of a monkey,' what would happen to him?" " Well," said the Sergeant, " he would be put in the guard-house." " Well, suppose he didn't say it but meant it, what would happen to him?" " Nothing at all," says the Sergeant. " Well," he says, " we will leave it at that."

Now, as far as regards the decision of the chair, I will say as the Irishman said. But to come down to it, seriously, I think tonight may be looked upon as the red-letter event in the history of the Empire Club. 'I am very sorry for those who are not present; they have missed a treat. For that treat we are indebted to our friend, Mr. Foss, and I am sure that every member present will heartily join in the vote of thanks that has been so ably moved by Mr. Morine and seconded by Mr. Ellis. To the other gentlemen who favoured us with their eloquence and their instructive knowledge on this great question we are also indebted, and while no vote of thanks will be offered or tendered to them I am sure we all feel as grateful as we can or should be. You have heard now, gentlemen, the vote of thanks to the Honourable -Mr. Foss. What is your pleasure?

The motion was carried amid loud applause and " God Save the King" was then sung.

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Relations of the United States with Canada and Great Britain


Comments on the evening's addresses. The nature of the addresses as a debate. Looking upon tonight as the red-letter event in the history of the Empire Club. The vote of thanks to the Honourable Mr. Foss.