Boundary Waters Between Canada and the United States
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 6 Dec 1951, p. 121-136


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Boundary Waters Between Canada and the United States


Problems in relation to boundary waters and waters which cross the boundary between Canada and the United States. The difficult nature of the problems because of the technical considerations relating to the use of water; the complex nature because they involve matters which are of concern both within Canada, between the Federal Authority and the particular Province affected, and also externally in the conduct by the Federal Authority of our affairs with the U.S. Questions to be considered under the jurisdiction of the International Joint Commission. A discussion of those problems specifically of current interest to the people of Canada in this audience, and in this part of the country. Questions at issue involving every aspect in the use of these waters for navigation, for the generation of power, for domestic and sanitary purposes. Questions arising concerning the conservation of these waters and of measures to prevent their pollution. A review of the specific issues under consideration. Treaties or agreements arrived at. Looking at some history: the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909, which established the International Joint Commission. Structure and membership of the Commission. Details of the Treaty. Commission recommendations. Requirements of any new Agreement. A need for early action applying not only to the works contemplated on both sides in the International Section of the river for power, but also for early action on the construction of the navigation facilities which recent estimates show will be used well up to capacity as soon as they are made available and because their absence has become a serious disadvantage to the trade and commerce of Canada. The principal of tolls; some remarks from Mr. Howe. Support from the government of both countries for the development of the St. Lawrence for navigation and power. A brief word on how the situation stands with regard to the St. Lawrence. Project details and expenditure figures. Employment to be given to labour on the project in Canada and the U.S. A quotation of the Resolution of the Canada-United States Permanent Joint Board on Defence which was read into the records of Congress. Recommendations by the Board and the Commission that the St. Lawrence project for navigation and power should be built—and promptly.