Three Imperial Topics: Imperial Ignorance; Imperial History; Imperial Unity
Publication:
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 21 Apr 1904, p. 173-202


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Three Imperial Topics: Imperial Ignorance; Imperial History; Imperial Unity


Imperial Ignorance—Mr. H.C. Osborne: Some words about The Empire Club of Canada and its interests. The ignorance which is said to exist in the Old Country with regard to Canadians and our affairs. The origins of this sensitivity by Canadians. Considering our own ignorance on Imperial matters. A consideration of the relative positions of Canada and Great Britain. The importance of these two countries in inverse ratio to their territorial extent. The mission to fulfil, of a Club of this kind, of an educative force. The speaker's choice of topic, made to indicate some direction in which he thinks the Empire Club might be an educative force; ways in which every member of this Club might be a missionary and spread the doctrines to support which this Club has been founded. Some examples. The topic of what Great Britain has done for Canada. The need for us sometimes to go back and consider the history which we are invited to break with if we change the position of Canada as an integral part of the British Empire. The characteristics with which the people transplanted to this country came. A review of the territory lost to Canada. The destiny of Canada. The issue of Independence and how much we have. The speaker's protest against the Americanization of Canada. Some comments about public life in Canada. Consequences of ignorance. Our duty to continue the task of educating our own generation and so strengthening the chain which had its beginning at the commencement of our own history. Imperial History—Dr. John Ferguson: Responsibility with which membership in The Empire Club is accompanied. Individuals who sneer at the love of country, and particularly at the recent development of Imperialism. Ways in which sentiment has built up and maintained great nations, and today is ruling the world. Appealing to every reasonable person for the spread of that sentiment, the love of the British Empire, building upon a foundation as broad as the human race and that can carry a superstructure as lofty as the human desires. Speaking today on "Imperial Sentiment, Its Evolution and Value;" dipping into the history of the world. Some words from Lord Beaconsfield, 1880, one of the first Imperialists. Deeds that have evolved the great Imperial sentiment of today. A word or two of our own country as a portion of the British Empire. Canada, judging the future by the past, having in her people the powers that made an Imperial Rome, added to the staying, colonizing, and civilizing qualities of an Imperial Britain. Imperial Unity—Mr. Barlow Cumberland: Some of the speaker's recent experiences in the United Kingdom. The inferior position which we Canadians occupy in the Empire by being so slight contributors towards its maintenance and defence. Learning respect for the tax-paying Englishman and the British subject in the Old land who pays for the care virtually of a world. Time for us to look upon these matters from a different point of view. The issue of our militia and defence. Point which may be fairly and properly taken as contributions by us towards naval defence. The strategic value of the Canadian Pacific Railway more completely understood; seen to be, as the Siberian Railway is worth to Russia, many battleships and many steamships; so the rail communication across this continent is worth a great deal to the Empire. Our established fishery protection cruisers and our proposed maintenance of training ships upon our own sea frontiers coming to a more complete understanding of our duty for the protection of trade upon the wider seas. The issue of Imperial Reciprocity and what that really means: the cultivation and preservation of home industries. The interchange between Imperial centres. Applying this to ourselves. Ways in which modern methods have brought the outer realms of the Empire into absolute and integral contact with each other. Each unit judging what is best for itself in building up this Imperial Reciprocity. The question of the dominant thought which we should have for the welfare and advancement of the whole Empire. Canada's interests, east and west. Thinking about how the British power exerted as it is in the far east is for our benefit just as much as it is for theirs, although we make so little contribution towards its maintenance. This Canada of ours not all our own but a gift to us from the others who preceded us. We in Canada as trustees for the British race.