Getting Together
Publication
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 3 Jan 1924, p. 1-2
Description
Creator
Lauder, Sir Harry, Speaker
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Speeches
Description
A synopsis of this informal address is published. The aftermath of the war; the wrangling of the nations; the consequent difficulties in carrying on trade and commerce; the necessity for nations to get together on a friendly basis. The great English-speaking peoples to lead the way, and where there are difficulties, those with a grievance to come together with their British brothers to talk them over and, in the spirit of friendship and fair, find and way out and let justice be done. What turned the tide of war and brought victory. The getting together of the troops from every part of the British Empire, and from the United States. The speaker ended with a song which he composed.
Date of Original
3 Jan 1924
Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Copyright Statement
The speeches are free of charge but please note that the Empire Club of Canada retains copyright. Neither the speeches themselves nor any part of their content may be used for any purpose other than personal interest or research without the explicit permission of the Empire Club of Canada.
Contact
Empire Club of Canada
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

Fairmont Royal York Hotel

100 Front Street West, Floor H

Toronto, ON, M5J 1E3

Full Text

GETTING TOGETHER A TALK BY SIR HARRY LAUDER, Before the Empire Club of Canada, Toronto, January 3, 1924

Sir Harry, who was suffering from a severe cold, asked to be permitted to give a friendly chat instead of a formal address.

He referred to the aftermath of the war, the wrangling of the nations, the consequent difficulties in carrying on trade and commerce, and the necessity for the nations getting together on a friendly basis. "Let us be friendly" should be the motto of those who long for the establishment of a real, just and lasting peace. The great English-speaking peoples--the peoples that stand for the things that are fair and square--should lead the way, and where there are difficulties, let those with a grievance come together with their British brothers, table their troubles, talk them over and, in the spirit of friendship and fair play, a way out will be found and justice be done. That will be so much better than the madness of the awful war through which we passed.

It was the getting together of the troops from the mother-land, from every part of the British Empire, from the United States speaking our common language, that helped so greatly to turn the tide of war and brought victory. Here in Toronto if the Rotarians, Kiwanians, Canadians, and such clubs would get together with their brothers in the Empire Club what a power for this Canada and for the Empire they would wield! And there would not be a hall large enough in Toronto to hold all "when I come back on my fourth annual farewell tour."

He concluded his talk by telling how he composed his latest song, "If ever I marry again," specially pointed out the great moral truth wrapped up in the last two lines, "And I must be the boss of the house, If ever I marry again," and then sang the song as only he could sing it. A storm of applause brought the meeting to a close.

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Getting Together


A synopsis of this informal address is published. The aftermath of the war; the wrangling of the nations; the consequent difficulties in carrying on trade and commerce; the necessity for nations to get together on a friendly basis. The great English-speaking peoples to lead the way, and where there are difficulties, those with a grievance to come together with their British brothers to talk them over and, in the spirit of friendship and fair, find and way out and let justice be done. What turned the tide of war and brought victory. The getting together of the troops from every part of the British Empire, and from the United States. The speaker ended with a song which he composed.