A University Education That Canadians Deserve
Publication
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 6 Feb 2003, p. 293-303
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A University Education That Canadians Deserve


The year of University of Toronto's 175th anniversary. Some of the speaker's views on the current state of the University of Toronto. The role of public research universities in the nation's future. The special place of service of such universities. A discussion of what a leading research university is, and does. Canada's public university system and what it strives to provide. Research universities as a principal source for the creation of new knowledge in modern societies. Their role in stimulating economic growth. The goverments in the United States that recognize and support this role through funding levels and public policy initiatives that facilitate the transfer of knowledge for development in both the commercial and non-profit sectors. The speaker as advocate for the need for Canadians to increase their investment in higher education. Evidence that supports the speaker's views. Facing added challenges in Ontario. Criticl commitment. Equity and accessibiity as the cornerstones of Canada's public system and how universities remain somewhat hampered by outdated perceptions of what constitutes equity - with discussion. Differing mandates amongst universitites and what that means from a practical perspective. The need for Canadians to be prepared to help support Canada's best research-intensive universities and why. The concern of student debt. What the University of Toronto is doing. OSAP guarantees and limits of eligibility. The University of Toronto Green Papers in the consultation process of academic planning. Feedback and engagement requested from the audience. Re-imagining Canada's intellectual and knowledge-producing landscape.