Henry Ford As I Knew Him
Publication
The Empire Club of Canada Addresses (Toronto, Canada), 3 May 1923, p. 191-192
Description
Creator
Mackendrick, Lt.-Col. W.G., Speaker
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Speeches
Description
A description of Mr. Ford as he saw him on his first interview with him some years ago; an interview which included a three-hour conversation. Some of Mr. Ford's beliefs with regard to work and family. Henry Ford as an organizer, and as a public servant. Reportedly, a conversation with Mr. Ford on the British-Israel Theory was related. [This is a synopsis of a synopsis.]
Date of Original
3 May 1923
Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Copyright Statement
The speeches are free of charge but please note that the Empire Club of Canada retains copyright. Neither the speeches themselves nor any part of their content may be used for any purpose other than personal interest or research without the explicit permission of the Empire Club of Canada.
Contact
Empire Club of Canada
Email:info@empireclub.org
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

Fairmont Royal York Hotel

100 Front Street West, Floor H

Toronto, ON, M5J 1E3

Full Text

HENRY FORD AS I KNEW HIM SUMMARY OF AN ADDRESS BY LT.-COL. W. G. MACKENDRICK, D.S.O. Before the Empire Club o f Canada, Toronto, May 3, 1923

It had been arranged that Mr. W. J. Cameron, editor of the "Dearborn Independent," would address the members of the Club on "Mr. Henry Ford, the Man and his IDEAS and IDEALS." On the evening of the previous day a telegram was received stating that because of serious illness Mr. Cameron would not be able to keep his appointment. In this emergency Col. MacKendrick, who knew Mr. Ford, agreed to give an informal talk to our members.

He described Mr. Ford as he saw him on his first interview with him some years ago, an interview which included a three-hour conversation. Mr. Ford is a man apparently about the same age as the Colonel, gray-haired, slight in build, wiry, very quick in his movements, keen intellectually and anxious to get at essentials in subjects under consideration, a tireless worker, labouring more hours a day than any man in his employ.

Mr. Ford believes that every man should have an opportunity to work, earn a competence for himself and his family, preserve his self-respect and build up his character. He offers work not charity to the individual who solicits alms. He employs many returned soldiers, fitting the job to the man and paying a good wage.

As an organizer Henry Ford has no equal in America. He is a very wealthy man, but money has not spoiled him. His millions are only so many opportunities to give men work at generous wages and to enable him to render public service to the people as a whole.

He dresses plainly, eats sparingly, lives in a comparatively modest house and works fifteen or more hours a day because he is working at things he likes to do.

Toward the close of his talk Col. MacKendrick described at some length a conversation with Mr. Ford on the "British-Israel Theory," similar in outline to that presented by the Colonel in his address, October 26, 1922.

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Henry Ford As I Knew Him


A description of Mr. Ford as he saw him on his first interview with him some years ago; an interview which included a three-hour conversation. Some of Mr. Ford's beliefs with regard to work and family. Henry Ford as an organizer, and as a public servant. Reportedly, a conversation with Mr. Ford on the British-Israel Theory was related. [This is a synopsis of a synopsis.]